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Bulkie
Even though "bulkie" isn't in the dictionary, restaurants and recipe writers often use the term "Bulkie Roll" to describe a certain type of bread.
See Google search for "Bulkie."

Word Variants
Acceptable Variants
& Other Items of Lingual Interest

Before submitting an Eagle Eye entry
for spelling, capitalization, etc.
please consult Merriam-Webster and Dictionary.com.

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Barbeque
"Barbeque" is an acceptable variant of "barbecue."
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Blue Cheese
"Blue Cheese" is an acceptable variant of "Bleu Cheese." See dictionary.com.
Buffalo Wings
A lower casd "b" is acceptable when using the term "buffalo wings" or buffalo sauce.

See Merriam-Webster Dictionary.
Can
According to the Merriam Webster Online dictionary, one definition of "can" is: have permission to -- used interchangeably with "may": "You can go now if you like."
Usage "Can" and "may" are most frequently interchangeable in senses denoting possibility; because the possibility of one's doing something may depend on another's acquiescence, they have also become interchangeable in the sense denoting permission. The use of can to ask or grant permission has been common since the 19th century and is well established, although some commentators feel may is more appropriate in formal contexts. May is relatively rare in negative constructions (mayn't is not common); cannot and can't are usual in such contexts.
Caesar's Salad
This meal appetizer can be expressed in the possessive or not:
"Caesar's Salad" or "Caesar Salad."
For more info on this leafy treat see caesar-salad.com.
Canneloni
"Canneloni" is a commonly used variant for "cannelloni." See Google.
Coleslaw
This vegetable treat that goes great with Fish & Chips can be identified using one or two words: "coleslaw" or "cole slaw."
Cole: any of several brassicas; especially : any of various crop plants (as broccoli, kale, brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, and kohlrabi).
Slaw: Sliced cabbage served as a salad, cooked or uncooked.
See Webster's Online Dictionary m-w.com, also see dictionary.com.
D'Jour
"D'Jour" is an acceptable variant of "De Jour" or "Du Jour,"
as in "Soup D'Jour" (soup of the day.)
Eight Days A Week
This is an expression, kind of like 110%. See lyrics by The Beatles.
The Ellipsis …
The ellipsis is used to indicate the omission of words in the middle of a quoted sentence or the omission of sentences within a quoted paragraph.

In creative writing, the ellipsis functions to indicate that the speaker has trailed off and left a sentence or thought unfinished, perhaps to be finished or continued by the reader.
eMail
There are many acceptable ways to spell this word that means "A message or messages sent or received electronically over a computer network, as between personal computers": eMail, email, Email, E-mail, e-Mail, e-mail, E-Mail, etc. See Dictionary.com.
Expresso
"Expresso" is an acceptable variant of "espresso."
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Fettuccini
"Fettuccini", "fettucini", "fettucine" and "fettuccine" are acceptable variants of each other.
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Fillet
"Fillet" is an acceptable variant of "filet",
meaning "a piece or slice of boneless meat or fish;
especially : the tenderloin of beef".
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Homefries
"Homefries" is in common usage as an acceptable variant of "Home Fries."
See Google search for homefries.
Judgement
"Judgement" is an acceptable variant of "Judgment."
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Kabob
Kebab
Kebob
These three words are acceptable variants for: "cubes of meat (as lamb or beef) marinated and cooked with vegetables usually on a skewer."
Lasagne
"Lasagne" is an acceptable variant of "lasagna."
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Litre
"Litre" is an acceptable variant of "liter."
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Made Up
This expression can be expressed with a hyphen: "made-up" or without: "made up".
Meaning:
1 : fancifully conceived or falsely devised
2 : fully manufactured
3 : marked by the use of makeup
M-W.com lists it "made-up".
Dictionary.com lists it both ways.
Marinara
The word " marinara " does not require capitalization.
Marinade
The phrase "marinated chicken" is the correct English usage within sentence structure, "Marinade Chicken" is in fairly common usage for recipe titles.
Meat Balls
These tasty orbs often found on top of spaghetti, all covered with cheese, are commonly expressed as either one (meatballs) or two (meat balls) words.
Mushroom
The word "mushroom" is often used in a plural sense in recipes.
See:
Garden Burger with Mushroom and Peppers
Soy Sauce with Mushroom
Beef Kebabs With Mushroom
Steamed Egg with Mushroom
Napolean
"Napolean" is often used in place of "Napoleon."
See "Quotations by Author" at chittick.com
According to this source, Napoleon Bonaparte was born August 15, 1769, he died in 1821, and the spelling change of his name "was made after 1796."
Napoleon Bonaparte: "What is history but a fable agreed upon."
Nite
"Nite" is an acceptable variant of "night,"
and is a common advertising slang term.
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Omelette
"Omelette" is an acceptable variant of "omelet."
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Parmasiana
"Parmasiana", "parmisiana", "Parmesan", "parmigiana" and "parmigiano" are acceptable variants of this cheesy word, as in "Chicken Parmasiana."  Of all these, "Parmesan" must be capitalized, not necessary for all the others.
Portabello
"Portabello", "portabelo" and "portobello" are acceptable variants of "portabella."
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Quezadilla
"Quezadilla" is the Mexican spelling for "quesadilla." Both are acceptable on Menu Joy.
Quotation Marks and Adjacent Punctuation
Though not necessarily logical, the American rules for multiple punctuation with quotation marks are firmly established.

Commas and periods that are part of the overall sentence go inside the quotation marks, even though they aren't part of the original quotation.

Correct: "The best investments today," according to Smith, "are commodities and emerging-market stocks."
Incorrect: "The best investments today", according to Smith, "are commodities and emerging-market stocks".

(The original text quoted above is as follows: "The best investments today are commodities and emerging-market stocks, not domestic stocks and bonds.")

Unless they are part of the original quotation, all marks other than commas or periods are placed outside the quotation marks.

Correct: She provides a thorough list of problems in her most recent article, "Misery in Paradise"; she doesn't provide a solution.
Incorrect: She provides a thorough list of problems in her most recent article, "Misery in Paradise;" she doesn't provide a solution.

Correct: Wasn't it Dickens who wrote, "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times."?
Incorrect: Wasn't it Dickens who wrote, "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times?"
Rueben
"Reuben" and "Rueben" are are widely used variants of this sandwich name.
Saute
These four words are acceptable: saute, sauté, sauteed and sautéed.
There is no word "sautee", nor is there a word "sautée" in the English language. A Google search for the word "sautée" will return results mostly from French-language websites.
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com and dictionary.com .
Schrod
"Schrod" is an acceptable variant of "scrod."
See Webster's Online Dictionary at m-w.com.
Soup de Jour
"Soup de Jour" is an acceptable variant of "Soup du Jour."
Tarkiln Hill Road
Many people think the name of this street in New Bedford is "Tarklin Hill Road", and many pronounce it that way, but actually it's "Tarkiln Hill Road". A "kiln" is an oven, furnace, or heated enclosure used for processing a substance by burning, firing, or drying. Apparently, somehow this road was named after a kiln full of tar. There's another area named "Tarkiln" in Florida, click here to learn more.
Vegetable
The word "vegetable" can be a noun with a singular meaning or an adjective with a plural meaning. Some common forms of plural meaning are: "vegetable soup" and "mixed vegetable (soup, etc.)"
"Mixed vegetables" is seen, but you'll likely not see "vegetables soup."
Xtra
"Xtra" is an acceptable advertising slang variant of "extra."

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Page updated Sat 19-Nov-2016 11:51 AM